Pocket PMF

Pocket PMF: Media Overload

4 years ago by

Pocket PMF: Media Overload

Garance is at the studio today chatting with Emily, Audrey and Alison about media overload. They discuss consciously and unconsciously taking in information, what our responsibility is in the consumption of media, what sources are good and bad and much more. Some favorite news sources include: The New York Times, BBC, NPR, Sky News and PBS.

Photo by Pia Moore

12 comments

Add yours
  • I spent much of my career as a member of the media and can attest to how thoroughly the news is vetted, at least among your favorite sources. Things are checked and double-checked. Two sources must verify veracity. Then it goes through layers and layers of editors who second-guess everything and who debate the ramifications of practically every word. It isn’t fast and loose at all. At least in the traditional media.

  • may i suggest some other not so main stream news sources but very intelligent and reliable? and not owned by big corporations. enjoy!

    https://theintercept.com/
    http://teamhuman.fm/
    http://www.commondreams.org/

  • Great links, thanks for sharing them.

  • Thank you guys so much, first of all for your podcast in general (my friday commute to work is much more pleasant now listening to it) but espacially for this one. I’m a student in Paris studying communication and media and I’m training part time in the advertising team of a high fashion brand. Medias are basically my daily life and as much as I love that it can be very overwhelming especially for my generation where as you said, we pretty much only get the information we want to read. It’s scary and weirdly facinating at the sametime. This episode was very interesting and I couldn’t agree more with what you all said ! Please don’t change anything xx

  • 2 things:
    – this PPMF is not listed in the category PMF, I had trouble to find it
    – a friend of mine, that would very much agree with all that you said in this episode, decided to pay subscriptions to his favorite magazines and journals that he respects, reads and trusts. Now, more than ever, the world needs good journalism. And it serves nothing to praise New York Times (or whichever favourite media source) if you don’t also support them. How about you encouraging us to put our money where our heart is…?

  • Uhm, Sky News is owned by Rupert Murdoch who also owns Fox News. It’s a right wing news site.

  • Hi Janet,
    Yes! I am totally aware that Sky News is owned by Murdoch. That said, they do have segments in their programing where they just give the viewers straight facts, without pundits. It may take an educated viewer to understand what is fact and what is conjecture, but I find it very rare in American media these days to get any segments where I can just hear fact without punditry, while still being aware of the inherent bias of almost all mainstream news media. Unfortunately this is what 24 hour news has done to journalism! It’s a shame that this is the case, and I wish we would educate our youth more on understanding the differentiation between fact and fiction in the news.
    -Emily

  • Sur mon retour du travail vendredi, j’ai écouté ce podcast avec TELLEMENT de plaisir.

    Je concorde avec Audrey sur les cours d’éducation civique. Au lycée je me souviens très bien qu’on nous mettait par groupe de deux et que nous devions commenter le journal de 20h de TF1, France etc…en observant quelles étaient les différences dans la façon de présenter une même info. C’est une éducation que je trouve très utile pour développer l’esprit critique et rester objectif face à l’info.

    Garance parlait des infos aux USA, et ça m’a fait penser à la première fois que j’ai vu les infos en Italie (où j’ai vécu 5 ans). Le langage utilisé me choquait beaucoup. Le journal de 8h pouvait être construit sur 2 à 4 infos et parmi toutes ces infos, celles qui prenaient le plus de place étaient les faits divers. Je me souviens du meurtre présumé d’une jeune adolescente par son oncle. Et le langage utilisé par la journaliste incluait toujours des adjectifs diabolisant l’oncle. Meurtre commis ou pas, ce n’est pas le travail du journal du soir de juger quelqu’un (surtout qu’à la fin du jugement il s’est avéré qu’il était innocent…). Et je voyais mes colocataires deux filles intelligentes, étudiant le droit et la biologie donc des matières où les faits sont plus important que la spéculation, gober tout ça comme si elles n’avaient pas d’esprit critique. Du coup ça m’a fait penser que grandir dans un pays où l’info est présentée d’une telle façon, avec une bonne éducation ou pas, s’il n’y a pas de formation de l’esprit critique, les gens prennent l’information comme elle leur est présentée et c’est dangereux.

    Emmanuelle,
    http://www.thecuriousportafoglio.net

  • Gals, does anyone listen to Democracy Now! ? I’m surprised it wasn’t mentioned. It is by far my favorite news source, and I have a feeling you would appreciate it too, based on what you said in this podcast. It is really the only news I listen to on a consistent basis. Look it up!!!!!

  • Antoinette January, 23 2017, 4:42 / Reply

    This is for Emily: could you send maybe a booklist from your fiction bookclub? I’m part of a bookclub that has gotten SO heavy with very liberal, very serious books and I would love to maybe influence the group with more light-hearted books which inspire and relieve stress, not cause it!

  • Hey Antoinette!
    Of course! We are going to start doing a mini each month with a book review as well so hopefully that will help you find some new things to read!
    So far we’ve read:
    -The Trespasser by Tana French
    -The Flamethrowers by Rachel Kushner
    -The Autograph Man by Zadie Smith
    We have our next meeting in a couple of weeks where we’ll select our next book! I also just finished reading River Run by Joan Didion and really loved it!
    Let me know if you have any recommendations as well–we are always looking for new books! x

  • Netsanet Negussie January, 29 2017, 5:29 / Reply

    I would like to add that there are more publications that are informing the public about issues that hx marginalized and disenfranched groups experience. Mainstream media, historically speaking, have failed to adequately educate the public; to provide important hisrtorical, cultural, political and economic context to certain issues and events. So, while I do agree with the fact that there is media overload, I also believe the flip side of that; people are taking advantage of the social media network to establish content that provide a unque perspective and truth that otherwise would not be available to mainstream media. I follow DN!, ProPublica, The Intercept…and media outlets like Everyday Feminism, Remezcla, Muslim Girl. As a woman of color (black woman) born to freedom fighters from Sudan/ Eritrea, Northeast Africa, I am especially curious to learn about narratives and experiences different from my own. It is important for me because my experience may be different from the person standing next to me, but connected like a constellation.

    I’m not classically trained in news/ media (I have a degree in Neuroscience and Philosophy). I work in the documentary film industry/ art philanthropy. There is power in excellent long form, storytelling. i.e., I love Ta- Nehisi Coates, he does a fantastic job humanizing issues and reframing issues and topics with strong factual, historical evidence.

From the Archives

Holiday Gifting
  • Holiday Gifting
  • DORÉ x THE OUTNET
  • This or That
  • Happy Holidays!
  • #AtelierDoreDoes
  • How To...
Hill City: The Gift That Keeps On Giving

Hill City: The Gift That Keeps On Giving

Deb Watson’s Guide to Gifting

Deb Watson’s Guide to Gifting

The Gift of Giving Gifts

The Gift of Giving Gifts

lessons in gifting steven alan presents expert series garance dore photos

Lessons In… Gifting